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Equine Canada Represents Canada’s Horse Breeds to the World | Imprimer |
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September 24, 2010 — September 25, 2010, marks a historical day for horse sport in North America, and Equine Canada has taken important steps to ensure it will be a part of it.  As the gates open at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, Equine Canada’s trade show booth will be humming with activity while it celebrates the Canadian Equestrian Team along with their successes with Canadian-bred horses.
 
The 360 square-foot booth will be a large presence in the Games’ Trade Show Village as it showcases all of Canada’s horse breeds along with the Canadian Equestrian Team.  Partnering on location is a selection of the members from Equine Canada’s Breeds & Industry Division.  This includes the Canadian Quarter Horse Association, Canadian Warmblood Horse Breeders Association and Canada’s racing breeds as represented by Ontario Quarter Horse Racing Industry Development Program, Standardbred Improvement Program and the Thoroughbred Improvement Program.
 
One of the many promotional items that will be shared with visitors to the booth includes a special edition publication entitled From Meadows to Medals—The Canadian Equine Experience.  The 100-page book outlines the Canadian equine experience including short biographies of the competitors shortlisted to the Canadian Equestrian Team, a listing of all of Canada’s breed associations and the regional programs and organisations that help foster Canada’s mature equine industry. Special features in the book include a review of the unique environment in which Canadian-bred horses are reared and equine health care and education.  It also celebrates the tradition of horse sport and takes a look at both the historic milestones and current programs available in Canada.
 
Nineteen Canadian-bred horses were shortlisted to the Canadian Equestrian Team for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games which is nearly 30 percent of the total horses short-listed. “Canada has solid breeding practices along with skilled producers, trainers and competitors and it produces horses of more breeds than just about any other country in the world,” states Susan Stewart, Equine Canada Breeds & Industry Division, Coordinator Export Market Development. “Historically, Canada regards horse breeding very seriously and for more than a century equine pedigrees have been recorded through rigorous pedigree tracking according to standards legislated under Canada’s Animal Pedigree Act.
 
The Government of Canada passed the Livestock Pedigree Act, a federal government statute that defines the legal framework under which breed associations can be established, in 1900. Since its revision in 1988, the new Act, known as the Animal Pedigree Act (APA), has gone a step further by clearly defining the genetic ground rules for registering animals and it includes new ideas and knowledge pertinent to the equine breeding sector. Under the Act, animals may only be registered by national authorities, thus ensuring a high level of accountability and assurance. The basis of this federal act is to ensure that accurate pedigree information is recorded and preserved on a national basis, thereby improving animal breeds and livestock in general. Secondly, by developing consistent national standards for the representation of an animal’s genetic background, the integrity of the information for domestic and foreign trade purposes is increased and it provides protection to buyers of breeding stock.
 
High standards aside, this is a time of celebration.  The Equine Canada booth, listed as booths 107, 109 and 111 and found in the trade show area of the Kentucky Horse Park, is a place to network, exchange ideas, and celebrate horses of many breeds in all the world’s equestrian activities.  It will be the central hub for Canada’s equestrian competitors, fans, and industry specialists.
 
“This is the first time the Games have been held in North America, and it has attracted both competitors and fans of horse sport from throughout the world,” said Cheryl Tataryn, Manager of Marketing & Communications, Equine Canada.  “We extend an invitation to everyone who will be attending the Games to come by the Equine Canada booth for some Canadian hospitality!”
 
This initiative is partially funded by the Agri-Marketing Program of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada and is in support of Canada Brand for food and agriculture.
 

About Equine Canada Breeds & Industry Division

Equine Canada Breeds & Industry Division provides a structure for breed organizations and industry partners operating in Canada to unite as a coalition under the national federation of Equine Canada. It provides a forum from which to seek and exchange information between Equine Canada, Canadian stakeholders, the Government of Canada and foreign entities. The Breeds & Industry Division works to promote and assist a vibrant equine industry and to affect policy in Canada. Breed organizations and industry partners share resources and expertise with unity of purpose to increase the long-term profitability of Canada’s equine sector and to ensure its future viability.
 
About Equine Canada

Equine Canada is Canada’s national governing body for equestrianism.  A member-driven, charitable institution, it is the executive branch of the Canadian Equestrian Team, and the national authority for equestrian competition; the national voice for recreational riders; and the national association for equine welfare, breeding, and industry.  Equine Canada is recognized by the Government of Canada, the International Equestrian Federation (FEI), and the Canadian Olympic Committee as the national organization representing equestrian sport and equine interests. For more information about Equine Canada, please visit equinecanada.ca.