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Find a Coach

Find a Coach

You can search for an EC Certified Instructor or Coach near you by clicking the Find a Coach button.  You can search by region, city, coach level and type.  It is recommended that you keep your search as wide as possible at first.

How to Read the Search

  1. Current and Active Coaches and Instructors: Those with contact information showing are professionally current and active and have opted to have their contact information displayed.  There is currently an overlap between the old Equine Canada coaching certifications which designated Levels 1, 2 and 3, and the new program with the Instructor of Beginners and Competition Coach streams.  Coaches will be listed according to the latest certificate obtained.
  2. Inactive/Not EC Certified: Certification is an important lifetime achievement.  All other EC certified coaches are honoured in the list, but do not have contact information displayed.  If a coach or instructor is not listed, they are either inactive, or have not been certified by Equine Canada.
  3. Select a Coach or Instructor at the level appropriate to your needs.  To help you select the coach/instructor level appropriate to your needs, this chart describes the rider development levels (Long Term Equestrian Development- LTED) each coaching level specializes in. 
a.    Use the left-hand column (LTED Stages) to describe your current riding and competitive level.  Scroll over the levels to read a brief description.
b.    Then use the right hand columns to determine which Coach or Instructor type would likely specialize with students at your level.  The right-hand columns also show you how to compare the old levels, with the new Instructor and Competition certificates.
EC Coaching Specialization by Equestrian Development Stage

To read more about each Long-Term Equestrian Development stage, scroll your mouse over the LTED Stage colour block on the left.
 
Your Development Stage
  Find the Coach/Instructor Specializing at Your Level
     New NCCP Program Old NCCP Levels 
     
FUNdamentals: This stage is characterized by equestrians just starting out who explore the fun experience of horses in a variety of ways; tend to be more in group learning environments and learn the basics of horsemanship and stable etiquette.  For an equestrian starting early, this stage would correspond to 3-8yrs of age.
   
 Learning and Training to Ride: Equestrians in this category are building on the basics through a multi-sport and diverse experience.  They will begin to specialize in some areas, continue to establish movement pattern building blocks, and be ready to incorporate mental skills training such as visualization.  An instructor or coach teaching this level would seek to keep lessons concrete and task oriented.  While equestrians may be at this stage much later in life, the human development window where this stage is optimized is between 8-14yrs of age.  Competition should not be a significant percentage of equestrian activity time below the age of 14.  
 Learning and Training to Compete: Equestrians at this stage begin to consolidate and refine basic equestrian skills while acquiring new skills. Consistency is key.  Emphasis is on building personal excellence by developing independent problem solving skills, and having clear ideal performance standards.  The Equestrian at this stage competes at the beginner to intermediate level, but much more time is spent training than competing.  While equestrians at this stage may be much older, the optimum human development window for training skills in this stage is 12-18yrs.  Growth spurts should be monitored to take advantage of windows of trainability for endurance and strength.  Competition is selected mostly for rider development and should not be predominant.  
 Learning and Training to Win: Equestrians in this stage are more highly focused.  They may be serious adult competitors, or skilled youth between 16-21yrs.  Equestrians in this stage would not yet be professional or full-time trainers or instructors/coaches.  Training goals are focused on developing the optimal performance state, including mental preparation, tactical thinking when confronted with multiple factors, managing emotions.  Competition is a more significant percentage of equestrian activity time.  Competitions are selected to best suit the horse/human team development and potential results, and would tend to be from intermediate to advanced levels.  
 Living to Win: Equestrians at this stage refine skills and tactical strategies, channel efforts to the strengths of both the human and equine athlete, structure training to specific performance requirements and train for the unexpected (random conditions which may occur in competition).  Since equestrian athletes can compete seriously for decades longer than is common in most sports, longevity as an athlete is very dependent on appropriate training plans and cross-training that takes effects of aging into account.  Young adults should have developed lifetime personal athletic conditioning habits by this time, and middle-aged riders should be pro-active in personal conditioning and addressing/preventing strains if they hope to have a long riding career.  Competition in this stage is selected to best suit horse development (any competitive level), or the horse/human team potential results at a high level.  
 
participant involvement and coach selection2
The 6th stage of LTED is known as ‘Active for Life’.  Equestrians in this category are usually adults at various stages of equestrian ability, leisure or competitive interest.  An Equestrian in this stage would seek a coach appropriate to their level of ability and competitive involvement.

Learn more information about
Long-Term Equestrian Development (LTED).

(Information in this list comes directly from the Equine Canada database.  Information in the database comes directly from members and coaches/instructors.  Errors and missing information should be reported to Equine Canada.  If you are an EC certified coach or instructor and cannot find your name in this list, or wish to have your name or contact information removed, please contact Equine Canada.)

 
FUNdamentals: This stage is characterized by equestrians just starting out who explore the fun experience of horses in a variety of ways; tend to be more in group learning environments and learn the basics of horsemanship and stable etiquette.  For an equestrian starting early, this stage would correspond to 3-8yrs of age.
 
Learning and Training to Ride: Equestrians in this category are building on the basics through a multi-sport and diverse experience.  They will begin to specialize in some areas, continue to establish movement pattern building blocks, and be ready to incorporate mental skills training such as visualization.  An instructor or coach teaching this level would seek to keep lessons concrete and task oriented.  While equestrians may be at this stage much later in life, the human development window where this stage is optimized is between 8-14yrs of age.  Competition should not be a significant percentage of equestrian activity time below the age of 14.
 
Learning and Training to Compete: Equestrians at this stage begin to consolidate and refine basic equestrian skills while acquiring new skills. Consistency is key.  Emphasis is on building personal excellence by developing independent problem solving skills, and having clear ideal performance standards.  The Equestrian at this stage competes at the beginner to intermediate level, but much more time is spent training than competing.  While equestrians at this stage may be much older, the optimum human development window for training skills in this stage is 12-18yrs.  Growth spurts should be monitored to take advantage of windows of trainability for endurance and strength.  Competition is selected mostly for rider development and should not be predominant.

Learning and Training to Win: Equestrians in this stage are more highly focused.  They may be serious adult competitors, or skilled youth between 16-21yrs.  Equestrians in this stage would not yet be professional or full-time trainers or instructors/coaches.  Training goals are focused on developing the optimal performance state, including mental preparation, tactical thinking when confronted with multiple factors, managing emotions.  Competition is a more significant percentage of equestrian activity time.  Competitions are selected to best suit the horse/human team development and potential results, and would tend to be from intermediate to advanced levels.

Living to Win: Equestrians at this stage refine skills and tactical strategies, channel efforts to the strengths of both the human and equine athlete, structure training to specific performance requirements and train for the unexpected (random conditions which may occur in competition).  Since equestrian athletes can compete seriously for decades longer than is common in most sports, longevity as an athlete is very dependent on appropriate training plans and cross-training that takes effects of aging into account.  Young adults should have developed lifetime personal athletic conditioning habits by this time, and middle-aged riders should be pro-active in personal conditioning and addressing/preventing strains if they hope to have a long riding career.  Competition in this stage is selected to best suit horse development (any competitive level), or the horse/human team potential results at a high level.

Active for Life
: Support an ongoing multi-sport and diverse life experience.  Participate in equestrian activities as an active athlete or alternative way such as a career in sport or volunteering.  Value participation in leisure activities equally with competition-oriented participants.