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Equine Medication Control

 

Equine Canada encourages all equestrian sport in all disciplines to participate in anti-doping measures and fair medication control to safeguard the health and welfare of all horses.

Anti-doping and medication control exists at Equine Canada competitions to enforce the prohibition against banned substances in horses so as to provide fairness to all participants, to protect the safety of riders, and to maintain the health and welfare of the horse and promote fair competitions.

Equine Canada has published Equine Medication Control rules which are closely aligned with the equine drug and medication control regulations developed by the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency (CPMA). A description of permitted medications is included in these rules.

The Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency’s Schedule of Drugs is now available: Schedule of Drugs

The Equine Medication Control Guide is available here: Equine Medication Control Guide 

Would you like more informaiton on Equine Medication Control check out: "My Horse was Selected for Testing" Pamphlet now available

 

NCCP High Performance Equine Clean Sport Module - Richmond, BC - March 7th, 2014

The Fédération Équestre Internationale (FEI) has developed a competitor guide to help explain prohibited substances, allowable medications, elective testing, responsibilities, and liability.

“Launch of FEI Veterinarian ID Card for FEI Events and changes to Veterinarian Education -  please follow this link http://www.fei.org/new-vet-id-card

 

Kari MacGregor, Program Coordinator – Equine Medications - This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it - 613-287-1515 ext. 117

2013 Equine Medication Control Prohibited Substances

 ATTENTION COMPETITORS!!

 

The Equine Medication Control Committee (EMCC) would like to remind all competitors, owners, grooms, trainers, etc. of a few prohibited medications in particular. The following substances are prohibited and have resulted in positive testes in 2011 and 2012.

 Procaine– Penicillin G Procaine is an antibiotic which contains a local anesthetic, Procaine. The CPMA detection time is up to 425 hours and the Equine Medication Control Guide states that Procaine can be detectable up to 45 days. A detection time is not a withdrawal time and Equine Canada generally recommends doubling the detection time for a conservative withdrawal time to insure that a medication violation does not occur. Please consult your veterinarian for specific advice for your horse. This is a Class 3 Violation according to the Equine Canada Drug Classification Scheme.

Firocoxib(Previcox or Equioxx) – There is change in the detection for this medication There are no equine approved Firocoxib formulations in Canada. Equioxx is only approved in the United States for horses and Previcox is only approved in Canada for dogs. Therefore, it is a prohibited substance under Equine Canada medication rules and the detection of any amount constitutes a violation. The detection time in Canada is 14 days for the Oral administration of 57mg once daily for 5 days. A detection time is not a withdrawal time and Equine Canada generally recommends doubling the detection time for a conservative withdrawal time to insure that a medication violation does not occur. Please consult your veterinarian for specific advice for your horse. This is a Class 3 Violation according to the Equine Canada Drug Classification Scheme.

 Ractopamine – This drug is commonly used in other species feed as a growth stimulant. Always check with your Feed Supplier to verify that your horse’s feed does not contain any residue from previous feed. This is a class 2 Violation according to the Equine Canada Drug Classification Scheme.

Please note that if your horse is on more than one medication/drug/supplement that the withdrawal times can be affected.

 Refer to the Equine Canada Drug Classification scheme and the Table of Fines and Penalties for all Equine Prohibited Medication classes and penalties available on the Equine Medication Control Website (http://www.equinecanada.ca/index.php?option=com_content&view=section&id=40&Itemid=704&lang=en).

 For further information, including our information guide, please visit the Equine Canada website under Equine Medication Control (www.equinecanada.ca) or contact This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Lausanne (SUI), 2 October 2012

2013 FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List in effect from 1 January

The FEI Equine Prohibited Substance List for 2013, which has now been approved by the FEI Bureau, will come into force on 1 January 2013.

Following a period of consultation with the National Federations, the FEI List Group held its most recent meeting during the London 2012 Paralympics and signed off changes to the List for 2013. The changes include the addition of five new substances and other amendments.

The changes, which will be included in the 2013 List and will come into effect on 1 January of next year, are summarised here and below:

  • Five new substances have been added to the List for 2013. These are the Controlled Medication substances Cyclosporin, a systemic immunosuppressant; Tropicamide, which affects the central nervous system and has a potential for abuse; Pitcher Plant preparation (Sarapin), which is reputed to have analgesic properties, a potential to affect performance and its use is considered to be a welfare concern; Delmadinone acetate and Chlormadinone acetate, synthetic steroidal progestins that decrease testosterone concentration and have the potential to affect performance;
  • Fentanyl and Morphine (analgesics), both of which are currently classified as Banned Substances, will be moved to the Controlled Medication section of the List in 2013 due to their increasingly common legitimate use in equine medicine;
  • Suxibuzone, which converts to Phenylbutazone in the body and is currently listed as Phenylbutazone, will be listed separately under Controlled Medications;
  • Deslorelin, which was categorised as a Controlled Medication substance in the 2012 List, will be removed from the 2013 List.

“The FEI List Group seeks to use the most up-to-date scientific research and information as part of its ongoing review of the Prohibited Substances List,” said Graeme Cooke, FEI Veterinary Director.

“The National Federations and all the Veterinarians involved in our sport are very much a part of the consultation process and all comments received on the initial suggested changes, which were first proposed in April of this year, were discussed by the List Group prior to the changes being finalised.

“Publishing the changes to the List 90 days in advance, in accordance with our rules, means that the National Federations and their athletes will have plenty of time to familiarise themselves with the changes well ahead of the 2013 Equine Prohibited Substances List coming into force on 1 January next year.”

The 2013 Equine Prohibited Substance List will be accessible prior to 1 January 2013 on the FEI Clean Sport website. Additionally, information is now available on the searchable FEI Equine Prohibited Substances Database, which is free to download for Smartphones.

 

 
GABA and Hydroxy-GABA to be added to the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List

July 2013- Memorandum to EC Competition Officials Regarding GABA and Injectable Magnesium

The FEI List Group is the expert group tasked with determining which substances should be included on the FEI Equine Prohibited Substances List and in which category (Banned or Controlled Medication.)

The substances Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and Hydroxy-gamma butyric acid (Hydroxy-GABA) were recently brought to the attention of the List Group, primarily by the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) because they are ingredients in a commercial product known in the USA as ‘Carolina Gold’. GABA is an inhibitory neurotransmitters and the USEF decided to prohibit it upon learning of documented adverse reactions in horses.

Based on this information, the FEI List Group has similarly advised the FEI to issue an immediate warning against the use of GABA and Hydroxy-GABA. GABA and Hydroxy-GABA will therefore be added to the FEI List of Equine Prohibited Substances with a 90-day implementation period as provided for in the rules. Starting immediately any request to an FEI Official/ Veterinary Delegate to administer a substance containing GABA or Hydroxy-GABA at an FEI Event will not be permitted.

This warning is being issued outside of the usual annual review process for the List Group.

 

 Vedaprofen No Longer a Permitted Medication in Equine Canada Sanctioned Competitions

 

February 16, 2012 —The Equine Canada Medication Control Committee is announcing the following changes to Equine Canada medication control regulations regarding Vedaprofen.

 


As of June 1, 2012, Vedaprofen will no longer be a permitted medication in Equine Canada sanctioned competitions. As a result, horses competing in Equine Canada sanctioned competitions with a positive test result for Vedaprofen will be sanctioned as per the Equine Canada penalty tables and drug
classification system as a Class III offence. A withdrawal time of at least 72 hours is recommended after the last administration of this product. For additional information, please see the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency Schedule of Drugs available on the EC website.

Equine Canada sport licence holders are responsible for keeping up to date on all changes to the Equine Canada equine medication rules.

 
 
 
Clenbuterol No Longer a Permitted Medication in Equine Canada Sanctioned Competitions

November 16, 2010 —The Equine Canada Medication Control Committee is announcing the following Medication Control information: Clenbuterol

As of January 1, 2011, Clenbuterol (Ventipulmin) will no longer be a permitted medication in Equine Canada sanctioned competitions. As a result, horses competing in Equine Canada sanctioned competitions with a positive test result for Clenbuterol will be sanctioned as per the Equine Canada penalty tables and drug classification system as a Class III offence. A withdrawal time of at least 72 hours is recommended after the last administration of this product. For additional information, please see the Canadian Pari-Mutuel Agency Schedule of Drugs.

Equine Canada members are responsible for keeping up to date on all changes to the Equine Canada equine medication rules.